Youth Program Poverty Guidelines – 2017

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Supplemental Youth Services Program (SYSP) High Poverty Area Guidance

WIOA Final Rule on SYSP Low Income Eligibility:

The WIOA Law, Section 129(a)(2) includes a special rule that allows for the term “low-income” to include youth living in a high poverty area.  Furthermore, WIOA Final Rule, at 20 CFR 684.430(3)(b), clarifies INA grantees may consider any youth living in a high poverty area as low-income.

WIOA Final Rule at 684.130 defines high-poverty area, as follows:

“High poverty means a Census tract, a set of contiguous Census tracts, an American Indian Reservation, Oklahoma Tribal Statistical Area, Alaska Native Village Statistical Area, or Alaska Native Regional Corporation Area, Native Hawaiian Homeland Area or county where the poverty rate for the INA population is at least 25 percent of the total INA population of such area using the most recent ACS 5-Year data. Alternatively, high-poverty also can mean, a Census tract, a set of contiguous Census tracts, an American Indian Reservation, Oklahoma Tribal Statistical Area, Alaska Native Village Statistical Area, or Alaska Native regional Corporation Area, Native Hawaiian Homeland Area or county where the poverty rate for the total population is at least 25 percent of such area using the most recent ACS 5-Year data. INA program grantees may use either definition when determining if a Census tract is a high-poverty area.”

The DINAP office is providing the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS) 5-Year 2011-2015 table of American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) Alone Poverty Rates for U.S. Reservations, Oklahoma Tribal Statistical Areas (OTSA) and Alaska Native Regional Corporations (ANRC), as a guide for determining whether a SYSP service area qualifies as a high-poverty area.

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Content Type: Resource
Target Populations: Indians and Native Americans

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Posted: 1/18/2017 5:02 PM
Posted By: Guy Suetopka
Posted In: Indian & Native American Programs
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